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Guest Blogs

Knowitall.ch often invites local experts in their field to contribute to their own blogs on our site. This means not only you will benefit from the useful recommendations that we make on our News pages, but you can also profit from some of the great advice and tips that these experts have to make on their favorite subjects. Whilst each of these bloggers has been recommended to us at some point during the evolution of Know-it-all passport and  knowitall.ch, obviously we are not able to test out all the suggestions they make on their blogs, nor do we necessarily agree with all their opinions.  So if you do find one of their tips useful (or not!), do let us know!

To make these blogs more accessible to you, we have now decided to group them altogether in one section, entitled Guest Blogs, accessible from our main menu bar.  We will also post the most recent blogs on the home page of our site in the right hand column.

We are still building up this area of the site, and are looking for bloggers in a number of sections, including Your Home, Travel, and Leisure, so if you feel you have a useful contribution to make in either of these areas, and have the time to submit blog entries approximately every month, then please get in touch!

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By Hiba Giacoletto, Wiser Humans

Connection is why we're here; it is what gives purpose and meaning to our lives.  - Brené Brown

A few months ago, my 11 year marriage broke-up.

Like all humans, I need connection. I crave connection. I can’t live without connection.

Learning to be just me after 15 years of being a couple, I needed to redefine connection.

I had heard Barbara Fredrickson speak about her research on Love 2.0 at a conference and I really related to her way of reframing love.

Her idea is that love is about so much more than romantic connections.

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Port de Pollença

By Rachel Beacher, Journalist

Flight bookings have just opened for this autumn and winter 2017/18. For people planning how to spend the colder months, where better than a picturesque Mallorcan port?

'Everyone – the English, the Americans – they all came to Mallorca in the winter.'

So observed the thriller writer Agatha Christie in 1935 in her short story 'Problem at Pollensa Bay'. Indeed, at the time, the major towns of Mallorca were so busy that the author's hero sought refuge towards the less popular north east coast of the island and by chance came across a pretty and bohemian bolthole – Port de Pollença.

I visited Port de Pollença during those pesky school holidays in October, when the weather is usually failing in Vaud and it is still many months until ski season.

I found it to be enduringly enchanting and unmistakably recognisable from Christie's pre-war portrait.

She describes how a private detective, attempting to escape from his work and from the bothersomeness of people in general, falls in love immediately with 'a small hotel standing on the edge of the sea looking out over a view that in the misty haze of a fine morning had the exquisite vagueness of a Japanese print.'

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By Sunita Sehmi, Walk The Talk

In her late 20s, Ms Aradhna Sethi moved out of her protected maternal home and into her new life as a wife in a country far, far away. Little did she grasp that she had, indeed, stepped into the tumultuous life of an expat spouse. Her whole existence changed and she experienced the flavours of life that she never had imagined. She is the author of "The Entrepreneur's Wife: A Survival Guide". The book will make you laugh, cry and help you manage your fears. She uncovers it all and whether you are the spouse, fiancée or girlfriend of an entrepreneur, a business owner yourself or simply a curious sit back you will thoroughly enjoy this book. I was lucky enough to interview Aradhna I really hope you enjoy her interview as much as I did.
 
Tell us a little bit about you. Who are you, where are your from, etc.…
I was born in India, I grew up in Chandigarh, Jammu, Delhi, Bangalore, Ahmedabad and Mumbai. My father worked with Indian Oil Corporation - and it was due to his promotions that the family moved every three to four years. Although leaving behind friends was always tough, my mother was my teacher, my psychologist, my guide - and my best friend for life. She was a constant source of encouragement as she bubbled with life and energy, telling my brother and I that it was time for a fresh start, time to leave behind what we didn't like and carry forth memories of the pleasant times. Those days, she ensured we kept in touch with our friends through letters. It was always fun.

I was a fairly good student, taking challenges and competitions in my stride.

While I schooled all over the country (excluding the east), my college life spanned Delhi and Bombay. I then joined Femina as a trainee in 1996 and left the magazine as the senior copy editor in 2000 - just before my wedding to Anil Sethi, with whom I moved to Switzerland in 2001.

Anil was then with IBM, but moved into the start-up world within a few years. He co-founded an ETH spin-off and went on to author "From Science to Start up" (Springer Publishers), which has been selected as one of the top 5 management books worldwide.

He set foot into the entrepreneurial world and in 2007, I turned into the entrepreneur's wife, financial safety net, mother, friend, counsellor, sounding board and much more.

Could you tell us more about your idea behind your book The Entrepreneur's Wife: A Survival Guide?
I studied journalism, but my final goal was always to be an author. I'd been toying with the idea of writing for a while, but life and its turns led me to always hold a job in the communications field. While it helped pay the bills of the start-up family, it took me further away from my dream for a while - until the time when I was angered and shocked to learn that my husband was writing a book. I couldn't stand the thought of him taking my dream away from me right under my nose; especially when I was supporting him all this while. That anger egged me to write, write and write - passion, anger, love, bliss, peace, chaos - it all flowed out of me and took the shape of my debut book. So yes, I have to thank him for the experiences and for the subtle and strong reinforcement to look at my own dream again.

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The book is largely autobiographical and women relate to it in many ways. I've been told by my readers that aspects of my life reflected some of their lives - they related, connected and bonded - and even learned how to deal with certain situations. The book has taken a life of its own among the readers who I've had a chance to interact with. And that really was the idea - to share a story that brought the readers to tears, made them face their fears, find their own solutions and get on with life with a smile.

The idea is to enjoy the highs of life when they come, and learn to roll with the blows. As readers, you will connect, laugh, cry and laugh till you cry again. You will be involved in the making and breaking and resurrection of an entrepreneur's wife.

Is it just for expats?
No - it's for women from all walks of life. And I hear, men have enjoyed sharing the read, too.

You also run Life, Spice & More what’s that about?
That's my social media (FB mainly) page for the promotion of this book and the others that are still work in progress...

What’s the next challenge for trailing spouses?
For many, it's continuing to be financially independent; or having to suddenly deal with the idea of being a 'housewife'. Unfortunately, this very important role is still underrated... Little do people realize - spending time with your kids and shaping them, it shaping the future attitude and direction of the world! A housewife does a lot - she's not a cook, but a chef; she may not earn, but she is a manager of finances, organizer of all services for the family - big or small, and a resource in times of chaos.

So yes - dealing with this role brings along its own perceived set of challenges.

Another challenge is keeping boredom at bay - many don’t know what to do with their time and tend to clamour for their home countries and get homesick beyond reason.

Language - that's a MUST to integrate. And integration is - to my mind - the key to settling in happily.

sunita AradhnacoverWhat’s next for you?
Many more books that provide value and joy to the readers.

What is the best piece of advice you ever got?
Change is the only constant - so chin up, embrace life - it's the only one you have; and the only way to create positive memories when you are in your golden years. This too shall pass is the motto to imbibe with a smile.

Anything else we need to know?
Just smile on and enjoy life.

Click here to get your hands on "The Entrepreneur's Wife - A Survival Guide"
Order via Amazon or download a kindle version. Enjoy the read!

 

Sunita's Bio

sunitablogphoto nov2015

Sunita is an Executive Coach, Trainer and Consultant. She is of Indian origin and was born in London before moving to Geneva in 1992. She has a Psychology background (specialising in Occupational Psychology) and a Post Graduate in the Development and Training of Adults. She also completed a Masters in Ressources Humaines, Coaching et Gestion des Carrières at the University of Geneva.

During her 25 years experience Sunita's drive has always been to help people to do their best and hence led her to create Walk The Talk.

In her free time Sunita is a Mentor for the Branson Center of Entrepreneurship and a proud member of the School in The Cloud Team.

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SH Kristin Louise Duncombe500

By Aislinn Delmotte, Settling Here

“Raising Global and Mobile Kids” was the theme of an interactive seminar run by Settling Here in Feb 2017 at Webster University. The expert guest speaker was Kristin Duncombe, a Geneva based psychotherapist and author. The seminar looked specifically at international identity and mental-health, and Kristin spoke about raising children in an international context, and the impact of a global, mobile existence on identity and self-esteem.  

The diverse audience included anglophone and francophone parents, who are raising children who are bi-cultural, bi-lingual and also third culture children. It’s not always easy to categorize one’s family and its culture but I liked Kristin’s presented definition of third culture which breaks down into three: namely the culture(s) of the family, the culture of the host country (ies), the expatriate subculture and/or the bi-cultural families subculture. There are a lot of cultures at play for some of our Global kids and the critical tasks for parents are to help their kids understand their culture(s) of origin, help them get along in mainstream society and also deal with being a "hidden immigrant".

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by Milena McRae, www.milenamcrae.com

According to Mayo Clinic research, embracing forgiveness and relieving yourself of past pains plays a vital role in our Physical, Emotional and Spiritual health.  

On the Physical level, letting go of the past boosts your immune system, lowers your blood pressure improving heart health, relieves acute and chronic pain, improves digestion and balances your hormones.  Emotionally, forgiveness reduces stress, anxiety and hostility, enhances self-esteem, increases compassion and opens us to better relationships. On the Spiritual level, we feel re-connected with our closer and wider environment, our world expands and we are open to hear the innate guidance on how to proceed every day in alignment with our greater purpose.

Yet for many, forgiving and letting go doesn't come spontaneously.   I would like to share with you the practice I have developed and find really easy to follow.